Skip to content

55. Compensation

08/04/2013

Good Friday was very good. It was bright and very cold, but straight after breakfast we opened the workshop doors and started assembling all the bits we had made so far.

The big worry – that the wings wouldn’t fit to the fuselage – was dealt with first, and they fitted absolutely fine.

The wing fitted to the fuselage absolutely perfectly. There are holes to be drilled for the pins, but these will be done later - this was enough excitement for one week!

The wing fitted to the fuselage absolutely perfectly. There are holes to be drilled for the pins, but these will be done later – this was enough excitement for one week!

Then we attached the tail surfaces, and – no surprise this, since we’d done it the night before – they fitted fine too. We had noticed before, and commented on it again today, that the elevators won’t go down very far before they contact the rudder horns. We doubt it’s going to be much of a problem in practice, but we would have thought they’d have left a bit more clearance.

The tail, showing the contact between the elevators and the rudder horn.

The tail, showing the contact between the elevators and the rudder horn.

We fitted the controls into the fuselage. All went more or less okay, though when we put the first part of the heel troughs in place, there was a bit of a shock.

The cockpit area, showing the original stick at the bottom and the original rudder bar at the top. The large cable running across the cockpit under the rudder bar is a critical structural component (it's slack because it's only in there temporarily) but obviously if you apply lots of rudder control your heel will contact the cable which isn't desirable.

The cockpit area, showing the original stick at the bottom and the original rudder bar at the top. The large cable running across the cockpit under the rudder bar is a critical structural component (it’s slack because it’s only in there temporarily) but obviously if you apply lots of rudder control your heel will contact the cable which isn’t desirable.

As you can see from the photos, the huge cable that runs across the fuselage where the wings are attached, goes just over the top of the heel troughs, and Rick pointed out that your foot would catch on it when you applied maximum rudder. This is weird, because there are detail drawings of the assembly at this point which don’t show the cable and therefore don’t identify the problem. Currently we think we might raise the heel troughs just enough to go over the top of the cable, but there is a risk then that you will be pressing on the rubber bar with your heels instead of your instep, and your foot might slip off. This is going to need a little bit of thought.

Then Rick suggested that we put dummy cabane struts on in order to be able to get the upper wing more or less in place, and that went fine, and so Rick and Theo held an upper wing in place while I dashed round with the camera trying to pretend I was photographing a complete aircraft. In truth, that’s stretching the imagination a little far, but it’s the nearest we’ve got so far, and it was VERY exciting.

All the parts we've made so far joined together. The top wing is held up with temporary struts until we get the proper ones.

All the parts we’ve made so far joined together. The top wing is held up with temporary struts until we get the proper ones.

This marked one of the most productive weeks of the build so far, and to see the whole thing laid out like this has been very, very rewarding. There’s a long list of jobs waiting to be done, but we’re all fired up now and can’t wait to get to grips with them! As the RAF say; per ardua ad astra!

Three builders - cold, but very happy. From left, Theo Will ford, David Bremner and Rick Bremner.

Three builders – cold, but very happy. From left, Theo Willford, David Bremner and Rick Bremner.

Advertisements

From → Building

One Comment

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. 58 Sit-uation | Bristol Scout

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: