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178. Dodge’s Opinion

22/06/2015

Friday 19 June.

We’d agreed to meet up with Dodge Bailey, the Shuttleworth Cllection’s Chief Test Pilot, on the Friday morning so that he could get familiar with the aeroplane, and try the engine out.

We all met up about 1000 and finished off the rigging while Dodge had a good look around the cockpit and the whole of the airframe.

He has more experience than anyone else in the country of flying early aeroplanes, and asked a good many questions about the aerofoil section and other pertinent stuff, and I went through the development history of the Scout so that he could better understand what might have been found wrong in the prototype, and what they’d done to fix it.

He wasn’t happy about the compass mounting, pointing out that it was possible to get your heel jammed in front of it which might impede free movement of the rudder. We came to the conclusion that the simplest thing would be simply to remove it, since it’s not of any practical use or historical accuracy or importance.

Then we rolled it outside and – at his suggestion – filled the tank about 3/4 full, which is how it would be likely to be flown for the first few flights. This would show if the increased pressure in the fuel system had any effect on the mixture control.

The engine started first pull, as always, and the run was successful. there didn’t seem to be any significant effect on the mixture control, which as before seems to have more or less no effect at all.

When he came to shut the engine down, however, it became apparent that the mixture valve wasn’t shutting off fully unless you held the control fully shut. This isn’t acceptable, since it’s the normal way of shutting the engine off  either in flight or on the ground, and it’s not immediately clear why this is happening, since it seems to work completely satisfactorily when the engine’s not running. We’ll need to do a bit more investigation2015-06-19 Bristol Scout Dodge Bailey into this.

Otherwise he was happy with the whole aircraft, and we were delighted to have spent time with such a delightful, modest and very experienced and wise man.

Then we posed 1264 in the sunshine for a few portraits.

2015-06-19 Bristol Scout Portrait 3 2015-06-19 Bristol Scout Portrait 4 2015-06-19 Bristol Scout Portrait 2015-06-19 Bristol Scout Portrarit 2

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From → Technical

2 Comments
  1. Dave from New England USA permalink

    I’ve seen accounts of how the RNAS Scout Cs first had the Danish “red ring roundel” at first, then placed the “blue center” within it for a decidedly “Aéronautique Militaire” French-style insignia, before literally “flipping” the red and blue color’s locations to bring everything to “UK-normal” into the 21st century!

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